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July Attractions

SAVE THE DATE:

MONDAY

JULY 16TH  7PM

BEMOVED

NEW DANCE

FITNESS EXPERIENCE

FOR ADULTS OF ALL MOVEMENT ABILITIES

EASY TO FOLLOW, THE WARMUP FLOWS

INTO DANCE STYLES SUCH AS DIFFERENT

MUSICALS, BOLLYWOOD, LATIN & DISCO

DANCE AWAY THE POUNDS & INCHES WITH A FRIEND

“AWAKEN THE BODY- STIMULATE THE MIND-FEED THE SOUL”

PRICE: $15 PER-PAY

MUST R.S.V.P.

JULY ATTRACTIONS:

PRENATAL YOGA, VINYASA YOGA, GENTLE THERAPEUTIC YOGA.

OPENING OF OUR TREATMENT ROOM OFFERING ALL TYPES OF MODALITIES TO MEET

THE DIFFERENT NEEDS OF EACH CLIENT. NEUROMUSCULAR, THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE,

DEEP TISSUE, REFLEXOLOGY, CRANIAL SACRUM, MYOFASCIA RELEASE, ETP, SPORTS

MASSAGE.

INTRODUCING: “KIDS ON THE GO” AGES 3 TO 12 YOGA, BALLET, JAZZ, THEATRE, PILATES.

REGISTRATION: AUGUST 8TH, 9TH & 10TH.

VISIT US ON LINE AT: rriccapilates.net FOR OUR NEW SCHEDULE

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Design, Execute and Modify a Program for Your Client

“The more you know about modifications and your clients, the easier it is to design a successful session.”

One of the most common obstacles pilates instructors face is the need to modify an exercise program during a session. A good instructor comes to a pilates appointment with a series of exercise for the client to do. However, even the most well-planned program may need to be modified. The key to success is knowing, based on the client’s unique biomechanics  and movement patterns, which modifications to make and how to implement them with confidence

Getting Started: Break Down Movement

Before deciding how to modify exercises during a session, you need to consider the rationale that underlies the program design. If you know how movement has been broken down to build a program, it becomes easier to analyze an exercise during a session and make adjustments. Here are some of the more common ways that instructors break down movement to build an exercise program:

1. Goal-Oriented

The aim is to develop a series of exercises that the client will execute over a period of time to reach desired goals.

2. Injury or Disease-Driven

The point is to tailor the program to certain limitations

3. Muscle Specific

4. Focus on Particular Joint

5. Compound Training versus Isolation Training

Isolation exercises are single-joint movements that focus on one muscle group, while compound exercises  use multiple joints and muscle groups.

Developing a exercise program is analogous to developing a business plan. You must create a foundation for how will lead the client to her/his desired results, while being mindful of all factors that will present themselves once the program begins.

Program Design:

Once you’ve decided how you’ll break down various moves, it’s time to choose the exercises for each session.

1. Scan for Structural Limitations

2. Watch For Unusual Movements

3. Estimate the Client’s Age Group

This action applies to youth and older adults.

4. Look at Body Weight and Mass.

5. Listen Carefully to the Client’s Stated Goals

This the most important evaluation of all and can deliver valuable information about the client’s bio mechanical characteristics. By listening, you learn how your client views his/her body, including limits and capabilities. 

Renee Ricca’s Instructor Tips:

1. Regress to Progress

2. Break down movements into simpler parts

3. Recognize the value in any movement

4. Stay Focused

5. Understand the concept of General Motor Ability

6. Know Your Client’s Exercise History and be Prepared to Incorporate it into your Modifications

7. Reassess Often

When a client struggles with an exercise that requires coordination, balance/strength, it is time to reassess the program. A complex exercise evaluated poorly is not nearly as valuable as an isolation exercise executed well.

In Good Health,

Renee Ricca

Mom Was Right All Along

Remember your mother saying, “Stand up straight”? Poor posture does more than diminish the appearance of self confidence and grace.  It hampers proper breathing, strains muscles and ligaments, and can adversely effect the joints of the back. These joints are prone to arthritis, sciatica and general back pain. In all my years of teaching, the complaints of my students have been about their stance, and not having the knowledge of how to realign their spines.  So I am going to share with you the basic fundamentals to attain correct posture.

Let us cultivate an awareness of the three natural curves of the spine, without being too technical: 1) slight concave curve of the neck (cervical); 2) curve of the upper back; and 3) the concave curve of the lower back.

Using an exercise ball, now we can begin a few postural exercises.  Sitting tall on the ball aligns the body safely and places the least strain on the body. The erector spinae are bands of muscles that run alongside your spine and are designed to work constantly to keep your spine erect.

Starting Position

Sit on the center of your ball, knees aligned with ankles, legs parallel and just wider than hip distance aprat. Feet are fimly planted, toes are long and relaxed and chin is level.  Think of pulling the navel up and into the back of the spine.

Action of Movement

Relax the shoulders. As the fingertips relax towards the floor, let the weight of the body drop into the ball. Lengthen through the top of your ears. This phrase is constantly used in the pilates system. We want a long neck, not a forced neck.  Think of opening the discs in the cervical spine and rolling the ears away from the shoulders.

Engaging the Postural Muscles

Lock your hand over your head. Inhale and gently extend your head upward. Exhale and resist the movement with your hands. This small movement helps activate the deep muscles which are close to the vertebral column. These small, deep postural muscles maintain an erect spine.

What makes the pilates method so unique is that you can practice these particular exercises while seated watching television or at your desk. Once you have the awareness, you are on your way to sitting up so straight that Mom would be proud!

8 Steps to Choosing a “Core Correct” Pilates Teacher

Renee showing a move on the reformer.Do you know how to choose a “Core Correct” Pilates teacher? Most people don’t.

On a daily basis, clients stroll into my studio sharing with me their nightmare Pilates experiences. My response is always the same: “Did you ever ask a teacher where they were trained?” or “How long have they been teaching?”

Here are some general questions and information you can use to search for a qualified Pilates teacher by getting to the Core of their training and experience:

  1. Are the instructors trained through a comprehensive training program?
  2. Did that training program require a written and practical test, lecture, observation, practice and apprentice hours?
  3. How many total hours are spent in the training program? (The Pilates Method is a knowledge based method of exercise and training. Time spent in certification training produces qualified teachers.)
  4. Does the instructor have any other movement related teaching experience?
  5. How long have the instructors been teaching Pilates?
  6. What is the instructor’s or studio’s philosophy and specialty? Are they able to handle special needs, injuries, and rehabilitation?
  7. Does the instructor or studio teach the full repertoire of Pilates on all pieces of apparatus?
  8. Teaching Pilates for whole-body fitness requires a great deal of specialized training, including a proven understanding of how the body moves efficiently.
Take these 8 steps out for a spin when evaluating Pilates teachers and remember to keep breathing.